European Parliament website hit by cyber attack

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BRUSSELS — The European Parliament’s website fell victim to a cyberattack by a pro-Moscow group just hours after lawmakers overwhelmingly supported a resolution declaring Russia a state sponsor of terrorism, the legislature’s president said Wednesday.

President Roberta Metsola said in a Twitter statement that parliament was “under a sophisticated cyber-attack” and that a “pro-Kremlin group has claimed responsibility”.

Legislature spokesman Jaume Duch said the website is “currently externally influenced by a lot of outside network traffic.” He added that “this traffic is related to a Distributed Denial of Service (DDOS) attack.”

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In distributed denial of service attacks, the perpetrators make websites inaccessible by bombarding them with unwanted data packets. DDoS attacks do not harm networks because they do not penetrate them. But they can be a nuisance, especially when targeting sites that the public depends on for essential information and services.

Metsola said EU IT experts opposed it and protect our systems.”

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She notes it came “after we declared Russia a state sponsor of terrorism.”

By a lopsided vote of 494 to 58 with 48 abstentions, EU lawmakers sought to step up pressure on Moscow to bring before an international court anyone responsible for war crimes committed from the start of the invasion on Feb. 24 to Feb. 24. to bring.

The 27-nation EU has condemned the invasion in the strongest terms and has repeatedly said several Russian actions in the past 9 months amounted to war crimes.

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At times, state-sponsored hackers have used DDoS attacks as a smokescreen for more serious attacks, as happened in Ukraine prior to the Russian invasion on February 24. But mostly they are used as a “noisy” political tool by hacktivists whose ties may be obscure.

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